Sam is in the serious money now

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The payout list – which reflects not only tournament prizes, but also mentions and appearance fees – is led by Russian tennis player Maria Sharapova, 25, former world No. 1 who pocketed 25 million dollars. dollars last year.

Dane Caroline Wozniacki, 21, is now the world No. 1 and in second place with $ 12.5 million.

Serena Williams’ older sister Venus is No. 4 on the earnings list with $ 11.5 million, Kim Clijsters is fifth at $ 11 million and Serena herself is in sixth place with $ 10.5 million. of dollars.

It’s a pretty enviable position. She won a lot of money, but it will snowball if she keeps winning

In Australia, Stosur is already the highest paid female athlete and was ranked 15th on BRW Rich list of Australian sports from 2010, with revenues of $ 2.9 million last year.

Dr Hodgetts said equality of prizes in grand slam tournaments was one of the reasons tennis became a source of money for female players.

“The coverage of women’s sport has come a long way. It’s now seen as a sport, not just a side show… before men’s events. These are now full-fledged events.”

But big cash prizes and multi-million dollar grants were not the norm in women’s tennis decades ago.

Margaret Court was the last Australian to lift the US Open trophy when she won it in 1973, and she was also the first female athlete to pocket the same prize – $ 25,000 – as the winner of the men’s singles, fellow Australian John Newcombe.

Yet in the other three majors, equal pay seemed an unlikely prospect.

“When [Australian] Rod Laver won Wimbledon, he got £ 2,000. And when I won Wimbledon that same year, 1968, I got £ 750, “American tennis player Billie Jean King told the TV station. CNN in a 2009 interview.

“I knew then that this would be one of our next battles that we will have to fight over the years.”

The US Open was the first grand slam tournament to offer equal prizes to men and women in 1973 and 1984, the Australian Open joined in – but not between 1996 and 2000.

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King ultimately won his battle for equal pay checks.

In 2007, Roland Garros and Wimbledon joined the other two Grand Slam tournaments by offering the same prize money for male and female champions.


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